The Saturn Return: A Turning Point in the Life Cycle by Donna Fisher-Jackson

Turn of the Seasons

The Fall is a perfect time to write about the Saturn return, an astrological transit that we all go through during our lifetime.  It can be a time of harvest.  It all depends on what you’ve created over the years. The more you can learn about the planet Saturn, and the timing of its return to the same point as when you were born, then you can go through this time period with more awareness, and even reap some of Saturn’s wisdom.  If there is one phrase that applies to Saturn, it would be:  “If you do the work, then you can reap the rewards.”

The Saturn return is an important turning point in each person’s life whether it’s their first return between ages 28 – 30; or their second return around ages 58 – 60.   Even people who don’t follow astrology may have heard of this transit.  The Saturn return is certainly a maturing transit where you can be faced with all those lessons of Saturn especially the ones you’ve been avoiding.    The planet Saturn has a way of reminding us of our responsibilities, and has often been called the planet of “reality checks.”  If you’ve been putting off some major decision, or holding onto the past, a Saturn transit can help you with the decision-making process.  If you’re holding on too tightly, it may not be accomplished in a gentle manner, but more like getting knocked over the head.  It doesn’t have to be a rude awakening.

In our society of quick fixes and taking the easy path, Saturn can be a hard lesson to learn.  If you’re willing to persist at a task, develop a discipline towards a goal, or take on the responsibilities of your life, then you can be richly rewarded by your hard work. I have observed many a person aim for a long-term goal, only to leave it by the way side because they didn’t want to do the work involved.   And yet, if you can stick with that goal, it can be an amazing feeling of accomplishment when you reach that mountain top that you’ve been striving towards all those days, months and years.

The Saturn return is one of those times when it becomes very clear what we have been putting off, or not willing to look at in our lives.   With the Saturn return, we can find ourselves leaving jobs, ending marriages, and making big moves especially if we’ve been hanging onto situations that no longer work for us.   The first Saturn return at ages 28 – 30 can be the first time when we really get serious about a career, a relationship, or starting a family.  At this age, it’s important to choose a path that’s true for you even if it doesn’t go along with mainstream society.   It may mean that you have to break away from your own family of origin’s wishes, and choose a career and/or a relationship that’s more in alignment with who you are as a person.  

In the recent news, I have noticed a disturbing trend of young celebrities at this age of 28 – 30 who are committing suicide.  In the news, it appears that these young men and women “had it all,” but obviously something was missing for them, and they didn’t feel they had any other option.   I wish they could have known about the Saturn return, and perhaps, if they knew that it was a transit that only lasted for a short time in the bigger picture of life, then they might have been able to make a different choice.  If you personally know of anyone in this age category who is struggling, please encourage them to see a counselor especially a professional who has an understanding of the cycles of adult life; and even better, if they know about the Saturn return.  It can make a huge difference in their life.

The second Saturn return at ages 58 – 60 can also be a challenging time especially if you haven’t made those changes in your 30’s, or even in your early 40’s when we all go through the mid-life transits.  Then you can be faced with having to make radical changes in order to live a life that is true for you.   If you’ve made those changes in your life, the second Saturn return can be a different experience.  It can be more of a harvest time where you get to really enjoy the fruits of your labor from all those years.   Some people retire under this transit, or even begin new careers, if they feel ready for a change in their lives.  It can be a time to integrate all of life’s experiences in order to move to another level of awareness.  Many people at this age also begin to share their wisdom with others perhaps by teaching, leading groups, or in their daily life.

With an awareness of the ages of this transit, then you can plan more accordingly on how you would like to navigate the lessons of Saturn.    Who knows?  You may find your Saturn return to be one of the most rewarding times of your life, and worth the hard work after all.

 By Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A. © 2018

Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A., CHT is a Certified Hypnotherapist, Western Astrologer and Author who counsels clients through her business of Iris Holistic Counseling Services on the road at http://www.DonnaFisherJackson.com. She has published the self-help book, The Healing Path of the Romantic: Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System and a novel, Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives, based on the true story of a Romantic. And now her latest book, a travel adventure book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road.  All of her books are available in a print and Kindle edition on Amazon.

Advertisements
Posted in Predictions, Western Astrology | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Insights from my Spiritual Retreat: Finding Home within

The Tower at Glastonbury Abbey - March 2018

To celebrate the arrival of spring (at least on the calendar), I went on a spiritual retreat on March 19 – 22 to a new place – the Glastonbury Abbey, a monastery in New England.  Every year, I like to go on a retreat and take time to be still, and do quiet practices like journaling, meditative walks, reading spiritual books, artwork, and just being.

In the past, I have gone to favorite retreat centers in California more than once, but lately, I have been going to new places.  Last spring, I went to the Monastery of the Holy Spirit in Conyers, Georgia which is a Trappist monastery.  It was my first experience at a monastery in the Deep South where I had a very inspiring and worthwhile visit.

This spring, I traveled to the Glastonbury Abbey in Hingham, Massachusetts, just south of Boston.  After driving through the historic town of Hingham with its stately New England homes, I arrived at the abbey which had once been the summer home of a wealthy family.  Now the monastery is ensconced inside the old stone mansion with the addition of a new chapel.  As I drove up the hill to the front entrance of the abbey, I was struck by this tall, stone tower off to the right.  Instantly, I thought of the Tor in Glastonbury, England which I had once visited. The grounds of the abbey, and the other stone buildings made me feel like I had stepped through a portal into the original Glastonbury Abbey in England.

After I checked in, the Abbot guided me to my retreat house.  At the time, I didn’t know he was the Abbot, leading the other Benedictine monks at the abbey until the next day when I attended Mass in their chapel.  Dressed in his formal robes, I now recognized the man who had guided me to my home for the retreat.  As he showed me around the three story house, he told me that I would be the only retreatant there for my three night stay.  A group of Buddhists monks were arriving at the end of the week, but until then, I was the only one in this rather, grand home.

The Abbot even mentioned since I was there by myself that I might as well choose my own room on the second floor.  The third floor rooms were smaller, and the first floor rooms had been closed off for the winter.  As I peeked in each room, I chose a room with more windows, and on the back corner of the house.  I thought it would be quieter than on the street side.  The room was also Room 25 (in numerology a # 7) which seemed perfect for a retreat experience.

Since I was the only guest, the Abbot also informed me that I was invited to have lunch, and supper with the monks at the monastery.  For my breakfast, there was a kitchen and dining room in the retreat house with all the necessary supplies including coffee, tea, breads, cereals and juice.  Each morning, I ate breakfast on my own schedule in the old, paneled dining room with brass candlelight sconces on the walls.

Stonecrest Retreat House at Glastonbury Abbey

The Stonecrest retreat house had the elegant details of crown molding along with leaded glass windows, and antique wooden doors with the crystal doorknobs, and brass keyholes.  I felt like I had stepped back in time into a grand era where homes were built to last and meant to be passed on from one generation to the next.  The home also had an extensive library of religious and spiritual books on all kinds of subjects including even more alternative schools of thought.  Each night, I sat on the leather couch in the library, selecting books to peruse, drinking in the wisdom of the writers.  Looking around the library, I thought I might have stepped into my own slice of heaven.

The Library at Stonecrest

As retreats often do, the time slipped into timelessness.  I filled my days with solitude and community.  I spent mornings, afternoons and evenings, mainly by myself, only venturing out to attend some of the services and to have meals with the monks.  The monks had their daily schedule of prayer which varied with different special events especially since it was the season of Lent.  One evening, I ate with the community of the monastery at a Lenten supper.  The soup and bread were simply delicious, followed by a talk by one of the parishioners.  The community was welcoming, and curious to find out what led me to this retreat center.  After leaving the presentation, I walked back to my quiet home, feeling quite safe and protected in the large house.

Even though I was alone, I didn’t feel lonely or afraid.  I felt quite comfortable, tucked away in my second floor bedroom.  I did lock my bedroom door at night, but it didn’t seem to be necessary since I was the only guest.  I thought I might hear some ghosts roaming about in such an old home, but I never encountered any wayward spirits.   During my stay, I only had a couple of visitors.  The librarian came by the first morning to shelf books, and the maid arrived on my last day.  In between, I was woken up one morning with work men, scrambling on the roof, nailing down shingles.  Another Nor’easter was coming on the last day of my stay, and they were preparing again for a windy, March storm.

As far as the meals with the monks, I felt like an honored guest to be invited to share in their meals in their own dining room.  A Grandfather clock ticked in the corner of their dining room, reminding them of their next scheduled service.  From 6:30 am Vigils to 7:45 pm Compline, each day was a series of services that brought them together throughout the day and night.  The public was always welcome to join them in the chapel.  The monks didn’t live a cloistered life set apart from the world.  They shared their sacred life with the local community, just like they shared their meals with me.

The meals were usually simple and healthy with salads, fruits, vegetables, and some kind of main course with meat.  They had their own cook, Francois, who made their meals for them while they each took turns serving the meals.  The last evening was a special dinner in honor of St. Benedict, their patron saint since they were Benedictine monks.  I had no idea what awaited me that evening.

When I arrived late at 6:35 pm, the group of monks were waiting for me.  I felt a little guilty at keeping them waiting, knowing they had such a strict schedule to follow.  They seated me in the middle of the table for this last supper.  Surrounded by eight men, all dressed in their black robes, I wore black as well to honor their humble life.  The ninth monk who turned out to be the Abbott served us the special feast.  First, he brought out salads for us to enjoy, and then, the main course, a homemade chicken parmigiana with pasta, and bread.  This evening, they had wine for dinner – the first time I had seen them drink wine.  As we talked and ate, relishing this feast, the Abbott told us to save room for dessert that he would be bringing by the dessert cart next.  I thought he was joking until he wheeled the cart out of the kitchen, loaded with delicious treats from a nearby bakery.  There were tiny cakes, pies, and the one I picked – cannolis, loaded with rich cream cheese and chocolate.  As we drank coffee and tea, we indulged in our decadent desserts.  I thought these monks really know how to celebrate a holy day.  I wondered what they might partake of at their Easter dinner.

After that amazing night, I left with such a feeling of abundance and warmth.  And lastly, but not least, a feeling of coming home.  I felt so at home at the abbey, and in my grand home from the past.

Now a month later, I still carry that feeling of home within.  It felt the strongest when I first left the monastery, and now, it’s a seed that has been planted within me.  I feel like I can now move around more easily, knowing that I am always at home within wherever I may be living.  Thanks to the Benedictine monks of the Glastonbury Abbey for their hospitality and warmth in making me feel quite at home in their sacred sanctuary.

By Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A. © 2018

Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A., CHT is a Certified Hypnotherapist, Western Astrologer and Author who counsels clients through her business of Iris Holistic Counseling Services on the road at http://www.DonnaFisherJackson.com. She has published the self-help book, The Healing Path of the Romantic: Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System and a novel, Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives, based on the true story of a Romantic. And now her latest book, a travel adventure book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road.  All of her books are available in a print and Kindle edition on Amazon.

Posted in Friendship and Community, Spiritual Retreats | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Staying in touch with people, near and far

Pen to Paper

In the sea of information that swims around all of us in today’s world, how do you choose which email, what newsletter, what blog, what video, etc to read, listen to, and watch?  Almost every day, I open my computer to this overwhelming sea, and wish that I could read all the emails that show up – at least the interesting ones.  I wish I could see all the postings of my Facebook friends, and to respond to each one of them.  I also miss talking to those friends on the phone, over coffee, at ladies nights, and in women’s circles.

In the midst of all these ways to communicate and stay in touch, I long for the face-to-face meetings.  I miss those intimate, in-depth conversations with people.  I don’t want them over the phone, or even in an email or on Skype, I prefer them in person.  I want to see the person’s eyes, their mannerisms like the subtle tilt of their head as they reveal how they really feel.  I want to see and hear their giggle at a story that we both share.  I want to take the time to linger over coffee, or a meal, and not rush, but really see and hear that person across from me.

I believe our world with all its ways to communicate is becoming more impersonal in the process.  Many people stay in touch now through texts and social media. Those communication tools leave me feeling distant and cool to the touch.  I do realize that many of my friends live faraway now, and that some of these tools are the only ones left right now for us to stay in touch.

Even with this distance between us, I wonder if there are better ways to stay in touch.  Maybe the lost art of letter-writing will make a come-back.  It could be a short note, a card, or even a post card.  Mailing a letter through the post office sounds so old-fashioned, but how many of us miss receiving those letters in our mail boxes?  We now send birthday greetings on Facebook, but what about selecting a special card that captures your relationship with that person?  Or maybe sending a card or letter for no reason, but just to let them know you’re thinking of them.

Paul Spangenberg 1843-1918 - What's in the cards 1911

“What’s in the cards?” 1911 by Paul Spangenberg

These brief missives being sent out in the mail could be the beginning of more love spreading around the country, and even the world.  As a young woman, I had pen pals in many far-reaching places, from England to Australia, and everywhere in between.  I wrote to people on a regular basis, and waited for those air mail letters to make it to my home.  I wrote to many of them for years, and now over the years, the letters have been lost through all my moving.  I wish I had those letters once again, and I could look up those long-lost friends, and perhaps, meet them in person, and let them know how much their letters meant to me when I was a young girl.  At that time, I felt a connection with more people than just the ones living in my small hometown.  I felt a connection with the world through those letters.

Perhaps, it’s time to reach out again through letters, and connect and re-connect with others.  Who knows where it could lead?   I am still yearning for that one-on-one connection with friends.  Perhaps, I will find that again in my new/old hometown on Cape Cod.

By Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A. © 2018

Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A., CHT is a Certified Hypnotherapist, Western Astrologer and Author who counsels clients through her business of Iris Holistic Counseling Services on the road at http://www.DonnaFisherJackson.com. She has published the self-help book, The Healing Path of the Romantic: Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System and a novel, Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives, based on the true story of a Romantic. And now her latest book, a travel adventure book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road.  All of her books are available in a print and Kindle edition on Amazon.

 

Posted in Friendship and Community | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

A Timeless Love Story for Valentine’s Day

Lovers by Karkabi, Irina Vitalievna

Lovers by Irina Vitalievna Karkabi

With Valentine’s Day this week, it’s the perfect time to reflect on relationships of all kinds especially the romantic kind.  Being a Type Four, the Romantic, I spend more time than most on the subject of relationships.  It has certainly been one of my favorite subjects to write about, showing up in two of my books. 

My first book, The Healing Path of the Romantic:  Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System highlights the journey of the Romantic in life, and especially in relationships.

My second book, Clara & Irving:  A Love Story of Past Lives is a novel based on the love story of my grandparents, Clara & Irving Fisher – a true story of a Romantic.  Told through the eyes of Clara, and her granddaughter, Danielle, the novel spans their lives from the 1920’s to 2010. The story takes place on Cape Cod, Massachusetts with many scenes at the Zeiterion Theatre of New Bedford, MA.  It’s not your traditional romance novel, but more of a story for those who have pondered the soul connections that we share with others that seem to transcend time.  Since it’s not possible to write a Past Life memoir, I decided to share this story in a fiction format, but many of the events in this novel are based on actual events.  I invite you to take this journey back in time.  I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.   The excerpt below captures the romantic tales of Clara and Danielle in this novel. 

Both books can be found on Amazon:  The Healing Path of the Romantic  and Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives

Reviews of Clara & Irving:  A Love Story of Past Lives

“Donna Fisher-Jackson has woven an exceptional story into a beautifully written tapestry of the life of her grandmother whom she discovers to be intimately connected with in a past life. This story will amaze you and keep you interested from the beginning to the end, when all the threads get tied together. From the moment the story opens in the graveyard where she and her family finally get a headstone for her father’s mother, Clara, I became intrigued. I love the way she moves from Clara’s life in the early 1900’s to her present life as Danielle. This is a love story you just can’t put down!” Constance S. Rodriguez PhD, Author of “Gifts of the Soul: Experience the Mystical in Everyday Life” Llewellyn, 2007.

“I have read and enjoyed your lovely story of Clara and Irving (and the other interesting characters who touched their lives). Your writing has a clarity of description that I found very easy to follow in my imagination and your detailed attention, particularly regarding nature, weather, the changing seasons and the clothing and appearance of the characters, was very impressive. I loved the dual timelines and the setting of the Z Theatre! It was very romantic, indeed, and with a nice touch of passion…and the eventual clarity, wisdom and understanding gained in the course of all those experiences… I also felt that your book in its’ entirety was excellent and very well-crafted: including the acknowledgements, historical background on the theater itself, beautiful cover and gorgeous author photo on the back with your bio!”  Emerald Alurin Stara: Author, Actor, Intuitive Consultant

cover-front-sm

 

The excerpt from Chapter 21 & 22 of Clara & Irving:  A Love Story of Past Lives

Chapter Twenty-One ~ Clara

Torn in Two

April, 1929

“I don’t know what I’m going to do about F.” Clara wrote in her diary. “I never expected to see him again.” On sunny days on her lunch hour, Clara liked to walk along the Onset Bluff.  Today, she had stopped to rest on a wooden bench high up on the bluff.  In early April, the beach’s only visitors were the seagulls roosting on pilings by the pier.  This time of year, the downtown streets were deserted.  The locals reveled in a leisurely pace at the coffee shops and restaurants.

Clara gazed out at the calm waters of the bay and wrote:  “As soon as I met Irving, I closed the chapter on that part of my life.  Now, F shows up again in my life, and he’s flirting with me as if time hasn’t passed by.   I’m going to stay away from the theatre.  I’m a wife and a mother now.  This is my life.”  Clara closed her diary.

Clara knew she should spend more time in the teacher’s lounge catching up on the latest news, but it all sounded like gossip to her.  She had so little time to herself. She treasured her solitary moments when everyone left the classroom for the day, and she could correct papers and make lesson plans for the next day.  And now that Fred had re-appeared in her life, she spent too much time daydreaming about him.  At least he respected her privacy and didn’t call her at home or at school.  But he had given her his work and apartment phone numbers.  She tucked the numbers in a side pocket in her wallet, knowing she should toss the paper away because she had no intention of calling him.

All week, Clara flirted with the idea of going to the theatre on Saturday.  Onset now had a theatre of its own showing silent movies and an occasional vaudeville review.  Since it was only around the corner from her apartment, she could steal away for a couple of hours while Emma watched the boys.

On Thursday night she rang up her close friend Marie who lived in Wareham.  “Hello, the Richards residence.” Marie answered.

Clara grinned into the phone.  “Don’t you think that’s putting the cart before the horse?  I mean you’re not Mrs. Richards yet.”

Marie let out a peal of laughter.  Clara pictured her red-headed friend holding the phone under her chin while she filed her nails.  Marie said, “I thought I’d give the name some practice in case Pete calls.”  Pete was her fiancé, and they planned to marry the following June when he finished medical school.

“Since you’re still single, how about seeing a matinee in Onset this Saturday?”

“In Onset?  Let’s go see a talkie in New Bedford.  Your namesake Clara Bow is starring in her latest picture, The Wild Party.  Maybe, your special friend can set aside some tickets for us,” said Marie.

“I can only get away for a couple of hours unless Emma can watch the boys longer,” said Clara, twisting the phone cord between her fingers.

“Please say you can go.  You can meet me at the theatre and I’ll do my shopping beforehand,” said Marie.

“You always have to stir up trouble, don’t you?  Wait until you have a mother-in-law and you’ll know what I mean,” said Clara, giving into Marie’s wishes with a sigh.

Clara thought she needed more married friends, but they only spent time at each other’s homes with the children around.  Because she was a teacher, they always asked her for advice on their children’s school work.  But she wanted to talk about other subjects – not just about raising children.  At least with Marie, they discussed stimulating topics such as theatre, art, politics, and of course, men.

Clara finished her call with Marie.  She placed a bunch of daffodils from the garden in a lavender pitcher and set it on the windowsill above the sink.  It gave her something to look at when washing the dishes.  As she filled up the sink, she looked down at her long fingers and her gold wedding band.  Always more household chores to do.  Her heart cried out for something new and exciting – a break from the daily routine.  Fred offered her that break, but it could also break up her marriage.  She loved Irving in spite of his nightly drinking.  Most nights he came home too exhausted to go out to the theatre.  He played with his sons, read the newspaper while he sipped his whiskey, and then collapsed into bed.  She missed the time when it was just the two of them.  After dinner, they would go for walks around town or even on the beach when the weather warmed up.  Those days were now misty memories.  As a young woman, she had high expectations for her life.  Now she wondered if she had settled for less than what she really wanted.  She felt a headache coming on and thought it’s time to go to sleep.

On Saturday, Clara chose a special dress for her afternoon at the theatre.  She slid on a peach sheath dress and wore her gold locket.  She placed a matching cloche on her short, dark hair.  She liked getting dolled up to surprise Fred especially since he didn’t know she was coming to the theatre.

Arm in arm, she and Marie strolled into the elegant lobby of the Orpheum.  Fred stood by the lobby bar talking to the bartender.  As if sensing her presence, he turned and beamed when he saw Clara and Marie stepping across the lobby.

“What a welcome surprise to see you two ladies.” Fred gave them both a European kiss on both cheeks.  He squeezed Clara’s arm with a disarming smile.

“Wait here, I’ll get you some tickets,” said Fred.

Clara and Marie gathered at the corner of the gleaming cherry bar by the velvet ropes and brass poles.  Marie opened up her compact and freshened up her rose lipstick.  Clara gazed in the bar’s mirror, following Fred as he moved across the lobby.

“Here you are, ladies.  Join me at intermission for some punch,” said Fred, as he handed each one of them a ticket envelope, winking at Clara.

Clara touched Marie’s arm.  “I’m going to the ladies lounge.  I’ll be right back.”  She left Marie chatting with Fred about the new talkies.

Once safely inside the ladies lounge, Clara opened the ticket envelope and discovered a piece of paper – “C, Overjoyed to see you today.  Can’t wait to be alone with you.  I’ve some special news for you. Yours, F” Clara’s hand trembled and a warm flush spread throughout her body as she imagined Fred’s sweet caresses.  She hurried back to the lobby.

The ushers led Marie and Clara to their seats and the lights dimmed.  Lost in her thoughts about Fred, Clara could barely concentrate on the new talkie.  At intermission, Fred had their glasses of punch waiting at the bar.  The bartender took out a champagne bottle from underneath the bar and spiked their drinks.  Clara sipped the tingly bubbles feeling light-headed.  Marie giggled a little too much.

When Marie went to the ladies lounge, the two lovers had a moment alone.  Fred whispered in her ear, “You look so fetching.  I can’t wait to unwrap you.”  Clara’s cheeks grew pink.

Clara whispered back, “You make my heart race.  I wish we could leave right now.”

Fred said, “Let’s go.”  But Clara knew he had to stay until the end of the matinee. Then he would have time to sneak away for a secret rendezvous.

The second half of the movie dragged on.  Clara couldn’t wait to see it end.  Marie gave her a quick kiss and ran off to meet her fiancé for dinner.  Clara went the back way to Fred’s apartment, knowing it would take him more than a half hour to leave the theatre.  She rushed up the now familiar stone steps, and withdrew the key from the plant pot on the stoop.  No snooping neighbors so she slipped in the door.

As she expected, the apartment was in disarray since Fred didn’t plan on her coming today.  She tidied it up and searched in the ice box for something to drink.  She found a half bottle of wine, and some soda pop, but not much else.  Clara poured herself some soda and rifled through the bedroom closet for something inviting to wear.  She chose one of her favorite nightgowns – a midnight blue, silk gown with a slit up one thigh, and slid on her white high-heeled slippers.  Clara spritzed on her favorite perfume that Freddie had bought her at Christmas.  She fluffed up her short bob and freshened up her ruby-red lipstick.  When she finished primping, she heard someone at the door.  Clara hid in the bathroom until Fred yelled out, “Hey, Doll!”

Fred met her in the parlor with an armful of early spring flowers of daffodils and tulips.  Tucked under his other arm, he carried a loaf of French bread, along with cheese.  She couldn’t believe he had taken time to stop at the store.  He kissed her lips lightly, handing her the bouquet.

“Picked just for you, Madam,” he said, giving her an exaggerated bow.

Clara reciprocated with her finest curtsey.  “Merci beaucoup, mon Cheri.”

Fred clasped her hand and twirled her around. “Let me look at you.  You’re more swanky than Clara Bow.”  She did feel like the “It” girl with him.  They sat at his dining room table, sipping their wine with slices of bread and cheese.  With Fred, each time was different.  Sometimes they ate first and caught up on each other’s news.  Other times he couldn’t keep his hands off of her.

Tonight, he couldn’t wait to share his news. “I’ve some great news about work.  They purchased five theatres on Cape Cod.  I’ll run all of them including the New Bedford and Fall River theatres.”

“That’s wonderful, Darling,” Clara said, as she nibbled on a piece of French bread.

“That means we can meet on the Cape, and have a picnic on the beach in the summertime.  You can take the train down to Buzzards Bay and I’ll pick you up,” said Fred, caught up in his own romantic plans.

Clara didn’t want to spoil his fun to remind him that she had three sons to take care of in the summer.  It wouldn’t be that easy for her to get away.  By her second glass of wine, Clara agreed with him, caught up in his grand plans for the both of them.

Fred peeked at her over his wine glass. “Ready for dessert?”  He carried her off into the bedroom, where they spent the rest of his free time between shows making love.  This time Fred took his time caressing her until she melted with desire.  Her life in Onset seemed a million miles away.

Chapter Twenty-Two:  Danielle

Music by Midori

May, 1991

One cool night in May as Danielle finished some press releases, she heard the distant strains of a violin.  It must be Midori, the classical violinist, rehearsing on stage.  The lyrical notes of the music drifted down the hall.  After the staff left for the night, Danielle tiptoed down the hall into the technical director’s office. The door to the fly rail stood wide open.  She peered down upon the stage, where Midori feverishly practiced a piece of music over and over again.  She admired Midori’s demand for perfection.  She wondered how someone so young could have such intense self-discipline.

Enchanted with the music, Danielle didn’t hear the footsteps behind her until she felt hands upon her waist.  Not prone to screaming, she took a sharp intake of breath as a man’s lips pressed against her neck.  As his hands moved up her body to her breasts, she recognized the hands and relaxed into Rob as he kissed her more passionately on her neck.   As Midori stroked her violin reaching higher and higher crescendos, Rob reached under her sweater.  When she couldn’t take it any longer, she turned around to face her seducer and kissed him hard on the lips.  Pulling her in, Rob held her tight as Midori’s music quieted down.  Rob whispered in her ear, “Saved by the violin.”

She whispered back, “You’re quite the bandit…sneaking up on me like that.”

Rob closed the fly rail door, leaving only a slice of light.  “So you’re complaining?”

“I’d just like some fair warning for a change.”

“I’m warning you now…I’ve got my eye on you,” said Rob, as he brushed a strand of hair away from her face.

Midori’s music had stopped.  Rob said, “I’m helping Mike out tonight…keeping an eye on the star performer.  Better go check on her.  Be back in a moment.”

Still mesmerized by her music, Danielle gazed down upon Midori as she pointed at a sheet of music in front of her pianist.  The fly rail offered an eagle’s eye view of the stage, but it was mostly used by the stagehands, who climbed out to drop down curtains, and adjust lights.  Danielle hurried back to her office to check her makeup.  She studied her flushed face in the mirror hidden behind the door.  Her blue eyes sparkled.  She found the rush of being taken by storm intoxicating.  But it seemed to be the only way Rob could have a relationship with her.  When he came back from checking on the “star,” she hoped they could talk.  She had some questions for him.

A few moments later, she heard someone coming up the steps two at a time.  Rob strode down the hall back to the TD’s office.   When he noticed Danielle missing, he backtracked down the hall and stopped short at her office.  Holding a Coke and a Diet Coke in his hands, he said, “I thought you had disappeared into thin air.”  Danielle accepted the Diet Coke and took a big sip.

“Now, I’m dying for a smoke,” said Rob.

Danielle held on tight to her soda can.  “Sounds like an addiction to me.  I’m only addicted to love myself.”

Rob stopped playing with his cigarette pack. “Yeah, I can see that.  Betcha have lots of admirers.”

“Is that what you think?  That I have men lined up at my door?” Danielle set the can down on her desk.

Rob backed off a little. “No, but if you wanted to, you could.”

“So what’s your story?  Do you have a woman in every port like Casanova?” Danielle challenged him with a direct look.

He burst out laughing and sat down on the other chair in her office.  He leaned back in the chair with a big grin. “That’s my game.  A woman in every port from Maine to Florida.”

Danielle sensed he didn’t want to talk seriously.  He still basked in the high from their romantic encounter.

Danielle probed some more.  “I’m wondering where we stand,” she said emphasizing the ‘we.’  “Is this only a casual fling for you?”  Danielle pursed her lips, watching him sweat.

Rob dropped his chair legs back down to the floor and slid his chair, backing himself into a corner.  “I hadn’t really thought about it.  I’m enjoying living in the moment.”

Danielle crossed her arms over her breasts. “Sounds pretty casual to me…at least I know where I stand… another woman waiting on Casanova…except this woman wants more.”  Danielle hopped out of her chair, reaching over to hold Rob’s chin.  She gave him a firm kiss on the lips.  “Something to remember me by…It’s been fun while it lasted.”  As she strutted down the hall, she called back, “Shut the door when you leave.”

The next morning, Danielle found a note tucked into her desk blotter.  She unfolded the theatre’s ivory stationary and read, “To the Fairest Woman in any port, I hope we can find a way to be together again,” signed with a flourish of a “Z.”  She instantly recognized the “Z” as the mark of Zorro, another mysterious man.  She could see the resemblance between the two men: both men liked to hide behind a mask, dress in black, and only revealed themselves in the dark of night.  Danielle wondered when Zorro would strike again.

By Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A. © 2018

Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A., CHT is a Certified Hypnotherapist, Western Astrologer and Author who counsels clients through her business of Iris Holistic Counseling Services at http://www.DonnaFisherJackson.com. She has published the self-help book, The Healing Path of the Romantic: Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System and a novel, Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives, based on the true story of a Romantic. And now her latest book, a travel adventure book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road.  All of her books are available in a print and Kindle edition on Amazon.

 

Posted in Past Lives, Romance | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sharing the RV lifestyle with family

Jim as Camp Host with Denise & Jacob Fisher at Holiday Hills RV Park in Coalville, UT

As the New Year begins, Jim and I have been helping my sister begin her own RV journey.  She’s buying an RV for vacations with her son during the summer.  It’s fun to be a part of her excitement about buying an RV, and planning adventures on the road.  We’ll be sharing with her our all-important check lists for the RV.  The lists have kept us from driving away, and forgetting important items behind at the campsite.  In the excerpt below from my book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road, I share a couple of the check lists from my book.  There are many more in the resource section at the end of the book. 

Donna’s latest book can be found on Amazon.com  and as a Kindle E-reader, Click here to go to the Kindle store.

BookCoverImage

Editorial Reviews of Living the RV Lifestyle

“As the title indicates, this is a book with a lot of practical advice and personal experiences gleaned from living full-time in an RV…Her book details how to buy, prepare and afford the RV lifestyle of your dreams. This book would be especially helpful for newbies, but would also serve as reminders for experienced RVers.”

Marcella Gauthier, columnist of, From the Bookshelf in the Escapees Magazine (www.escapees.com)

 “Whether someone is considering a full-timing road trip as a permanent way of life or a temporary adventure, Living the RV Lifestyle: Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is filled with the author’s many valuable tips for making the most of it.  Trying to balance domestic chores with the RVing learning curve is a challenge for most people. Toss in the need to earn a living while constantly changing locations and the business of learning how to be a nomad turns into a full-time occupation. For anyone who needs to manage all of these lifestyle factors, Donna’s new book lives up to its promise of providing practical advice for success.”

Rene Agredano, columnist for RV Life Magazine (www.rvlife.com)

 My new book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is a combination of practical advice on RV living as well as personal stories from life on the road, giving you an idea of what it’s really like to live the Full-time RV life.

The excerpt below is from the Resource Section at the end of the book:

Fifth Wheel – Closing Check Lists

Inside List

  • Lower TV antenna
  • Secure TV’s
  • Lower window Blinds
  • Close vents
  • Secure all chairs, kitchen table, recliners, cabinet doors, shower doors, Sliding doors to bathroom and front closet.
  • Lower stove cover
  • Lay towels over bottom shower door track (prevents water from coming out on floor)
  • Shut off water heater
  • Water pump off
  • Fireplace off
  • Secure kitchen faucet handle with Bungee cord
  • Secure fridge door and items inside
  • Remove all items from counters, bureau, vanity and desk area
  • Secure lamp
  • Re-check that all items are secure
  • Close slides Bedroom and others.
  • Kitchen make sure racks are locked in place
  • Large kitchen cabinet place pin in sliding section
  • Retract awning
  • Secure outside steps

Closing and Hitching Fifth Wheel to Truck List

Do Not Get Distracted When Hitching.

  • Do not remove wheel chocks until ready to travel
  • Raise rear stabilizer jacks
  • Dump waste water as needed (add chemicals to black water tank)
  • Fill fresh water tank if not using campground for 1 or 2 days
  • Disconnect TV cable
  • Disconnect electrical lines
  • Disconnect water and remove pressure gauge
  • Raise steps to trailer secure safety rail
  • Raise trailer to clear tailgate
  • Back truck to hitch (make sure trailer pin clears tailgate)
  • Make sure trailer rides up on hitch preventing high pinning and locks (using flashlight make sure trailer pin is locked in hitch)
  • Secure breakaway wire and place lock on hitch handle
  • Plug in trailer wiring to truck
  • Remove wheel Chocks
  • Lock all trailer doors
  • Remove wheel Chocks
  • Make one complete walk around trailer
  • If tight campsite have someone observe that you are clearing all obstacles
  • Check air ride level (Add air only when hitched to truck)

Fifth Wheel – Opening/Set up Check Lists

Do Not Get Distracted When Unhitching

  • When parking check that all slides-outs can open freely (trees, picnic table or post)
  • Add wheel blocks to level as needed
  • Chock wheels on each side of trailer
  • Lower front legs to take weight off truck
  • Disconnect trailer wiring and breakaway cable from truck
  • Pull pin on hitch in truck bed
  • Slowly pull truck out from under trailer (stop and check that trailer pin will clear tailgate)
  • Raise trailer as needed to clear tailgate
  • Level trailer front to rear (using front level)
  • Lower rear stabilizer jacks
  • Connect water hose with pressure valve
  • Connect electrical cord
  • Open slide-outs (check that no cabinet doors opened during travel)
  • Fill water system (before turning hot water heater on) could burn out heater if dry.
  • Open hot & cold faucet to bleed air from water system
  • Check that Fridge is operating in correct mode & temp.
  • Start water heater (if using gas you will need to light burner on stove to bleed air from line)
  • Extend awning
  • Remove straps from recliners, dinette and TV’s.
  • Connect cable or raise antenna (Use antenna reminder)
  • Connect sewer hose

By Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A. © 2018

Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A., CHT is a Certified Hypnotherapist, Western Astrologer and Author who counsels clients through her business of Iris Holistic Counseling Services on the road at http://www.DonnaFisherJackson.com. She has published the self-help book, The Healing Path of the Romantic: Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System and a novel, Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives, based on the true story of a Romantic. And now her latest book, a travel adventure book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road.  All of her books are available in a print and Kindle edition on Amazon.

Posted in RV Living, Traveling cross country | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Exit Strategy: Knowing when it’s time to leave the Full-time RV Lifestyle

Home for the Holidays

As we near the end of 2017, it feels like a good time to talk about The Exit Strategy.  In the RV world, it means, having a plan for the future when Full-time RVing is no longer your dream.  It may be a time when you desire to settle down in one place, or it may just not be feasible anymore for various reasons.  In the excerpt below from my book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road, I write about having an Exit Strategy along with my own plans for the future.  It’s never too early or too late to follow your dreams.

Donna’s latest book can be found on Amazon.com  and as a Kindle E-reader, Click here to go to the Kindle store.

BookCoverImage

Editorial Reviews of Living the RV Lifestyle

“As the title indicates, this is a book with a lot of practical advice and personal experiences gleaned from living full-time in an RV…Her book details how to buy, prepare and afford the RV lifestyle of your dreams. This book would be especially helpful for newbies, but would also serve as reminders for experienced RVers.”

Marcella Gauthier, columnist of, From the Bookshelf in the Escapees Magazine (www.escapees.com)

 “Whether someone is considering a full-timing road trip as a permanent way of life or a temporary adventure, Living the RV Lifestyle: Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is filled with the author’s many valuable tips for making the most of it.  Trying to balance domestic chores with the RVing learning curve is a challenge for most people. Toss in the need to earn a living while constantly changing locations and the business of learning how to be a nomad turns into a full-time occupation. For anyone who needs to manage all of these lifestyle factors, Donna’s new book lives up to its promise of providing practical advice for success.”

Rene Agredano, columnist for RV Life Magazine (www.rvlife.com)

My new book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is a combination of practical advice on RV living as well as personal stories from life on the road, giving you an idea of what it’s really like to live the Full-time RV life.

The excerpt below is from Chapter 15:  Exit Strategy

In our three years of traveling around the country, we’ve met many Full-timers from newbies to RVers who’ve been on the road from five to eight years, and even longer.  One couple had been Full-timers for 10 years, and then bought a house in a place that they always loved to visit.  Now, they travel six months of the year, becoming one of those part-time Full-timers.

No matter what age you are when you begin the Full-time lifestyle, you may want to have a plan for the future when living on the road Full-time isn’t your dream life anymore.  It doesn’t have to be a plan written in stone because maybe, you are on this journey to find that next place to call home.  You may want to think about what your options are for the future.  In this chapter, I’m going to cover some of those options.

One option for the future is buying a house or a condominium in one of your favorite places to live which is probably the easiest to imagine especially if you’ve just left your home behind.  You may still have some of your belongings in storage, and even planned on setting up a home again someday.  There are all kinds of reasons to establish a traditional home again from wanting to live near family and friends, to having a community around you in one location; and from needing more living space, to having a yard again because you love to garden.  At some point, you may also want to be near your circle of support again including your doctor, dentist, hairdresser, etc.   Many RVers seem to make this decision as they get older, and need to be closer to doctors and people that they depend on.  If you have family and friends in more than one area, and you’re open to working with a new support team, then you may be open to other options.

Staying in so many different campgrounds the first year of our travels, Jim and I saw many people who were living in one campground Full-time.  Like us, they had sold their traditional home, and downsized into an RV, but they were content with keeping their RV home in one campground.  Sometimes, it was a financial decision because they still worked in the area, or moved there for a job.  Other times, they had moved to the area that they loved, and wanted to call home, but we’re not quite ready to give up the RV lifestyle.  It certainly is a great way to try living in different areas of the country, and get to know the surrounding towns, and even the neighborhoods before you decide to buy a traditional home there.

Some RVers also have two locations that they go back and forth between:  One campground for the winter/spring, and one for the summer/fall.  That’s also another option, and probably the best of both worlds.  If you live in a colder climate, then you may love to head south for the winter.  An RV home makes it very affordable to live in two different places – a lot less expensive than having to buy two homes.

In the second and third year of our travels, Jim and I have been staying in campgrounds longer especially since Jim started doing workamping stints.  We’ve lived in Florida for five months, in Utah for four months, and then North Carolina for another four months.  It really gave us the opportunity to explore a new area, and imagine ourselves living there.  Staying in one place longer, we also met people who had moved there, and were living in the campground Full-time.  It gave us a chance to meet some of the “locals” and find out what it’s really like to live there longer than a season.  This method also seemed to be a good way to try out different regions of the country, and decide on a future location for a traditional home.

One of the biggest reasons that people give up the Full-time RV life is when they are no longer able to do it physically.  Some make that decision before their health becomes an issue, but most start to notice the signs, and then look at their options.  One of the best options for those who want to continue to live in their RV is the Escapees CARE (Continuing Assistance for Retired Escapees) program www.escapeescare.org  which is a nonprofit adult day care and residency program designed for RVers who are unable to travel for a time because of age, injury, sickness or surgery.  The facility is located next to the Escapees Rainbow’s End campground in Livingston, Texas.  They have set aside a certain amount of RV sites for Escapees independent living along with some sites for volunteers who assist with the program.

The Escapees CARE, Inc. is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors, with a professional staff running the facility.  The requirements are that you be an Escapees member, and able to pay one month in advance.  Because the facility is non-profit, they receive donations, and volunteer support which allows them to offer their services at a lower cost.  Many people stay there for only a short time to deal with a health issue requiring surgery, or stay longer depending on their health situation.  For a Full-time RVer, it’s an ideal situation to be able to receive health care and support while still living in your RV home.  The program is quite popular with a waiting list, and possible future plans of expansion with similar facilities in new areas.  With the Baby Boomer population retiring, and more people joining the ranks of Full-timers, it seems that the Escapees CARE program could continue to grow and expand in the future.  It is certainly a worthwhile nonprofit to support especially if you see yourself using their services down the road someday.

Our own exit strategy recently materialized.  Both my husband and I didn’t have a clear plan about what we would do after Full-timing.  We came to the Full-time RV lifestyle when everything seemed to be ending, and leading us in a new direction.  Since the direction wasn’t clear, we decided to give the RV lifestyle a try.  We hadn’t been dreaming about RVing in retirement, but it seemed to be a good option to see the country while we could.  It also allowed us time to explore what we’d like to do next in our lives, and where we would like to live.  Honestly, I thought we’d be out on the road for only a year, and then it lead to a second year, and now a third year.  I think that’s how it works out here on the road.  It’s a timeless life because you’re living a non-mainstream kind of life.  You’re not following the traditional lifestyle so time does seem to expand when you’re not rushing through your life to get to the next week-end.  You live more in the moment.

After our three years on the road, I longed to have one home that stayed in one place.  My husband and I built our first home, 30 years ago, and now, we’re going to build what could be our last home in our original home state of Massachusetts.  After living away for 20 years, we’ll both be close to the hometowns where we grew up years ago.  Some people say you can’t go home again, but we’re going to give it a try.  We’ll still keep our Bighorn RV, and spend winter/early spring in warmer locations so we’ll join the ranks of the part-time Full-Timers.  It feels like it will be the best of both worlds.  We’ll soon be starting another chapter in our lives.  In the meantime, we’ll see you out on the open road, and look forward to hearing from you about your RVing travels.  Best of luck on Living the RV Lifestyle.

By Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A. © 2017

Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A., CHT is a Certified Hypnotherapist, Western Astrologer and Author who counsels clients through her business of Iris Holistic Counseling Services on the road at http://www.DonnaFisherJackson.com. She has published the self-help book, The Healing Path of the Romantic: Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System and a novel, Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives, based on the true story of a Romantic. And now her latest book, a travel adventure book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road.  All of her books are available in a print and Kindle edition on Amazon.

 

 

Posted in RV Living, Traveling cross country | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Transitioning from the Traditional Life to the Full-time RV Lifestyle

Donna with the Bighorn in Onset, MA

Three years ago in November, 2014, I was preparing for one of the biggest changes of my life – Moving from a traditional home to my new Full-time RV lifestyle.  I had no idea what laid ahead for me on the open road.  It was a big leap of faith, and a step into the unknown.  The excerpt below from my book captures the transition to my new life on the road. 

Donna’s latest book can be found on Amazon.com  and as a Kindle E-reader, Click here to go to the Kindle store.

BookCoverImage

Editorial Reviews of Living the RV Lifestyle

“As the title indicates, this is a book with a lot of practical advice and personal experiences gleaned from living full-time in an RV…Her book details how to buy, prepare and afford the RV lifestyle of your dreams. This book would be especially helpful for newbies, but would also serve as reminders for experienced RVers.”

Marcella Gauthier, columnist of, From the Bookshelf in the Escapees Magazine (www.escapees.com)

 “Whether someone is considering a full-timing road trip as a permanent way life or a temporary adventure, Living the RV Lifestyle: Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is filled with the author’s many valuable tips for making the most of it.  Trying to balance domestic chores with the RVing learning curve is a challenge for most people. Toss in the need to earn a living while constantly changing locations and the business of learning how to be a nomad turns into a full-time occupation. For anyone who needs to manage all of these lifestyle factors, Donna’s new book lives up to its promise of providing practical advice for success.”

Rene Agredano, columnist for RV Life Magazine (www.rvlife.com)

My new book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is a combination of practical advice on RV living as well as personal stories from life on the road, giving you an idea of what it’s really like to live the Full-time RV life.

The excerpt below is from Chapter 4:  Transition Time:  Leaving your Traditional Life behind for Living in an RV

In the midst of this busy time in your life, you probably haven’t had a lot of time to reflect on what this big change will mean for your life.  Once, you make the decision, and begin the process of getting ready for the RV journey, there is so much to do that you can keep busy and not have to think about the impact of this change on your life.

Being a counselor, I’m familiar with how big changes can affect people.  First, you begin to think about the change, and then work through the issues such as listing the pros and cons of your pending decision.  Then, this big decision may begin to affect you emotionally especially as you go through the belongings of your home, deciding what to keep, and what to let go of.  You may begin to feel the impact of this decision which can bring up sadness and loss.  Letting go of your home, your community, and your whole lifestyle as you’ve known it is huge.

Like any loss, you can find yourself going through the stages of grief – Denial (This isn’t really that big. I’ve moved before.); Anger (How did I let my husband/wife convince me to do this?!); Bargaining (We can always come back and visit our old hometown.); Depression (I miss my old life, my home, my family, my friends.); and hopefully, you’ll get to Acceptance (I finally am enjoying my new lifestyle of Full-time RVing.)

The timetable is different for everyone.  We all go through loss in our own way.  Some of us will keep looking in the rear view mirror until we start to see the new road ahead.

My husband and I did go through this whole process differently.  He was ready to let go of his corporate career, and kept busy with all the arrangements of moving cross country, and handling our family estates.  I had a harder time with the move.  First, there was the leaving of California where we had lived for 17 years, leaving behind a dream home that I loved along with my home-based counseling business, and a community of friends and neighbors that had become like family.

As I prepared to leave California behind, I was still grieving the loss of my parents who passed away within a couple of years of each other.  I was heading back to Cape Cod to my family home to help with the process of getting it ready for my sister to move into.  I was also helping Jim with the loss of his last parent, and getting his family homes ready to sell.  For me, the losses kept piling up.  I thought I was dealing with them one at a time, but the busyness of selling homes, and moving kept me occupied.

The losses caught up with me once my husband and I headed out on the highway for our new Full-time RVing life.  Jim was excited to leave his corporate life behind, and to live a freer lifestyle.  I wasn’t quite ready to give up my work, and tried to continue my counseling work over the phone, and in person when I could, but it was challenging.  It probably took me about six months to get used to living on the road.  Returning to California on our trip around the country helped a great deal to re-connect with all of our friends, and have an Open House at our new Bighorn home.  Once, we left there, I began to find a rhythm with my new lifestyle.

My message would be to not downplay how big this lifestyle change can be.  Many of you are going through similar changes such as retiring from life-long careers, selling businesses as well as homes, and moving away from your support systems of family and friends.  There are many ways to stay in touch on the road with cell phones, internet, and occasional visits in person.  You’ll develop your own rhythm in time, and your own community of support on the road.  What also helped me is knowing that I would continue this Full-time RV lifestyle as long as it was enjoyable and working for both of us.  At some point, we could always go back to a traditional lifestyle.  Full-time RVing doesn’t have to be a forever choice.  In the final chapter, I talk about having an exit strategy for the future.  My personal story at the beginning of the RV journey is next.

The Adventure Begins – Preparing for the Trip of a Lifetime

It’s now about six weeks before I will be starting my new lifestyle on the road.  I have been waking up over the years in traditional homes, but in the coming year, I will be moving all around this incredible country.  I will be waking up in different places from a month’s stay to a few weeks, and in some places, only a one night-stand. 

Honestly, I am anxious about this journey on the road.  I waver between excitement to what was I thinking?!  I am traveling with my new RV home.  Like a turtle with his shell on his back, I am bringing my home with me.  It will be my only home.  I don’t have a home to go back to.  This is it – my turtle shell.  I am sharing this shell with my husband who happens to be a Cancer, the astrology sign of the crab.  I think he may be more comfortable with this idea of living in a shell.  I am a Libra, and enjoy living in a peaceful and beautiful space.  I am certain that I will find some of those spaces on the road, but then I wonder about those nights, spent in the Wal-Mart parking lot, or a few miles away from the Mardi Gras celebration of New Orleans. Will I find peace and beauty in those moments?!  Or will I have to dig deep into my personal tool box for self-help tools and resources, and remember to be present with all that is happening and unfolding around me in the moment. 

In this coming year, I know I will be challenged and stretched out of my comfort zone.  I also know that I will be held spellbound by the immensity and beauty of this great country that I live in.  From the rolling, emerald hills, to the stark, sandy deserts, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and everything in between, I know I will be marveling at the scenery of this country.  I know I will treasure those simple moments of having breakfast in a diner in the Midwest, to eating alfresco by the Gulf of Mexico.  I will relish hearing all those different accents, and laugh when they try to pinpoint my own New England accent especially when they see the South Dakota plates on my vehicles. 

In time, I will find a way to share my story of where I came from, and how I ended up on this cross-country journey, feeling too young to be considered a retiree, and too old to be traveling around the country to find myself.  I have spent years finding myself, and know that it has nothing to do with where you’re living.  The self-discovery journey is definitely an inner journey, and the one, I will be taking this coming year is an outer journey, but who knows?!  It may be a combination of both. 

By Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A. © 2017

Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A., CHT is a Certified Hypnotherapist, Western Astrologer and Author who counsels clients through her business of Iris Holistic Counseling Services on the road at http://www.DonnaFisherJackson.com. She has published the self-help book, The Healing Path of the Romantic: Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System and a novel, Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives, based on the true story of a Romantic. And now her latest book, a travel adventure book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road.  All of her books are available in a print and Kindle edition on Amazon.

Posted in RV Living, Traveling cross country | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Choosing your Home State – all part of the Full-time RV Lifestyle

Donna walking Zeus at Camp America in Salem, SD

Choosing your home base is part of the Full-time RV journey.  For over three years, I’ve been a resident of South Dakota (SD).  SD has been my home state even though I have never physically lived there, only visiting the state on three separate occasions.  My driver’s license, my car registration, my health insurance, and my address are all in SD.  The excerpt from my book below covers how you choose your home base.  It’s all part of Living the RV Lifestyle.

Donna’s latest book can be found on Amazon.com  and as a Kindle E-reader, Click here to go to the Kindle store.

BookCoverImage

Editorial Reviews of Living the RV Lifestyle

“As the title indicates, this is a book with a lot of practical advice and personal experiences gleaned from living full-time in an RV…Her book details how to buy, prepare and afford the RV lifestyle of your dreams. This book would be especially helpful for newbies, but would also serve as reminders for experienced RVers.”

Marcella Gauthier, columnist of, From the Bookshelf in the Escapees Magazine (www.escapees.com) 

 “Whether someone is considering a full-timing road trip as a permanent way life or a temporary adventure, Living the RV Lifestyle: Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is filled with the author’s many valuable tips for making the most of it.  Trying to balance domestic chores with the RVing learning curve is a challenge for most people. Toss in the need to earn a living while constantly changing locations and the business of learning how to be a nomad turns into a full-time occupation. For anyone who needs to manage all of these lifestyle factors, Donna’s new book lives up to its promise of providing practical advice for success.”

Rene Agredano, columnist for RV Life Magazine (www.rvlife.com)

My new book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is a combination of practical advice on RV living as well as personal stories from life on the road, giving you an idea of what it’s really like to live the Full-time RV life.

The excerpt below is from Chapter 3: Preparing for the Full-time RV Journey

Choosing your Home Base

Once you decide to become a Full-time RVer, then you have to decide where you would like your home base to be for such purposes as receiving U.S. mail,  your driver’s license, registering your vehicles, paying taxes, purchasing health care, where you’re registered to vote, where your will is drawn up, etc.

When you no longer have a permanent traditional home, then you need to choose a state for your legal domicile which is different from residency.  You can be a resident in more than one state, but you can only have one legal domicile.  In that one state, you have to establish contacts through such items as getting a mailing address, a driver’s license, etc.  The more contacts that you make in one state, then the state is more accepting that it really is your domicile.  If you try to have your driver’s license and vehicle registration in another state, then that state could claim you as a citizen of their state, and require you to pay their state property taxes and income taxes as well.  Since you are simplifying your life, it’s probably wise to pick one state, and have all your “contacts” there so it’s clear that this is your legal domicile.

Many people decide to stick with their current home state out of convenience.  Perhaps, you still have family there who can send you your mail, and you already have your driver’s license there, and your vehicles registered there.  But if you’re interested in moving to a less expensive state with no income taxes, and lower property taxes and insurance rates, then you may want to shop around for your legal domicile.

State Income Tax can be one of the key deciding factors.  The states with no state income taxes include:  Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington state, and Wyoming.  (New Hampshire and Tennessee also do not have a state income tax on salaries and wages, but they do have an interest and dividends tax which affects many retirees.)

Many Full-Timers find Florida, South Dakota and Texas to be the easiest states to choose as your domicile for the no state income tax rule.  You may still want to compare the states because insurance premiums and property taxes, along with driver’s license fees and vehicle registrations can vary a lot to see what the best deal is for you.

Personal property taxes vary from state to state, and some can charge a lot for your RV, and vehicles.  Vehicle registration fees also vary, and are worth checking out especially if there are any requirements on regular vehicle inspections such as once a year. You probably don’t want to drive back every year at a certain time to take care of the inspection.   Some states also charge a tax on the value of your vehicle when you register it. Usually you will get a credit for sales or use tax paid to the prior state, but not always.  It’s always a good idea to check out driver’s license regulations, and how long they are good for, and if you can handle license and vehicle renewals through the mail.  Most of the information can be found on an individual state’s website, and it’s best to check before you decide on a state.

Insurances such as Health, RV and Vehicle Insurances are also important to look into before choosing a state.  Get some quotes from insurance agencies in your chosen state.  If you happen to have your health insurance under a government program or retirement program where your state of residence doesn’t matter, then it will be a lot easier.  The Affordable Care Act made health insurance affordable for many, but was also more challenging for some Full-Time RVers depending on the state they lived in.  It’s wise to check your health insurance rates based on different states to get the best plan for the best price.  You may also want to seek out a national system of “in network” health providers so that your coverage is “portable” from state to state.  This website may also be helpful in your search for health insurance – www.rverhealthinsurance.com

Escapees RV Club also has mail forwarding services in the three favorite states of Florida, South Dakota, and Texas, and they are very helpful in explaining all the details to Full-timers. The club has many membership benefits, but there are extra fees for the mail forwarding service.  For more details, visit, www.escapees.com

Why we chose South Dakota as our legal domicile

Since my husband and I were leaving California, and had no plans to return there to live, we decided to look for a state that was the easiest and one of the least expensive states.  South Dakota came out on top for us.  First, to establish the state as our legal domicile, we found a mail forwarding service in South Dakota, and there are several to choose from.  The one we chose was recommended by a fellow RVer, located in Madison in the eastern part of South Dakota.  In hindsight, I may have chosen a mail forwarding service in one of the larger cities in SD like Rapid City or Sioux Falls, but Madison is a college town, on a lake, and very quiet and rural so it has been nice to call Madison, our home base.

After we established ourselves with the mail forwarding service, we received our address with our own private mail box (PMB) number.  We now get in touch with the service by phone or via email.  The mail forwarding service will send your mail to any location that you give them which could be where you’re staying at a campground or a relative’s home.  In addition, you can set up the mail forwarding based on your own preferences such as weekly, biweekly, and monthly.  The mail service also can help you with registering your vehicles, and recommending local insurance companies for your vehicles.

Once we secured our mailing address which we arranged while we were still in California, then we stopped in Madison, SD, and stayed for a couple of nights.  All you need to do to get your driver’s license and register your vehicles is to get a PMB for your local address, and to stay in SD for one night, showing proof of your stay with either a receipt from your hotel or from your campground.  Then go to the Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) in SD http://dor.sd.gov/Motor_Vehicles/  to take care of your driver’s license and vehicle registration. The mail forwarding service also helped us with the DMV paperwork. The driver’s licenses are good for five years, and then you would need to return in person, but you can handle vehicle registrations, and insurances through the mail.  (The state of SD now requires you to sign a Residency Affidavit which you also bring to the DMV.)

Ahead of time, we also contacted a local insurance agent for the vehicle insurances including the truck and Fifth Wheel, and to determine what the property tax would be on both.  The rates were very good, and reasonable, especially compared to California.

The main reason we return to South Dakota every year has been for the health insurance.  Being only in our 50s, and not having any other health insurance, we chose insurance through the Affordable Care Act, and it has been a great insurance plan.  www.AveraHealthPlans.com  in Sioux Falls, SD is our company, and the doctors and services have been outstanding.  Avera is one of the companies in SD that didn’t have any issues with Full-time RVers.  The way health care is changing, it’s hard to say what the future will hold.  We’ve only traveled back to SD once each year to see our primary doctors, and coordinated our trips around the country to pass through SD.  We’ve also been able to have questions answered, prescriptions filled, etc. while we’ve been living on the road.  We haven’t had any major health issues, but for those who are 65 and older, you probably could handle your health insurance needs through Medicare, and with a supplemental health insurance plan.  If you’re under 65, then it does take some shopping around for the best plan.

After choosing South Dakota, we actually considered switching to Florida when we were looking at buying property there, but between their rule of having to live in the state for six months and a day along with the higher vehicle insurance rates, we decided to stay with South Dakota.  We didn’t really look into Texas, but with the Escapees RV Club based in Texas, they would be a big help in assisting with locating your domicile to their state.

Returning to South Dakota every year has begun to feel like returning “home.”  We still sightsee around South Dakota, visiting sites like the Corn Palace with artwork entirely made out of corn, and the Wall Drug Store, a wonderland of western art and photo collections with a restaurant and unique retail outlets.  The incredible national memorial and parks of that state have also made it well worth our time to visit every year.  We have our favorite campgrounds, and our memorable experiences like driving right through Sturgis, SD during the 75th annual Biker’s Rally in 2015.

By Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A. © 2017

Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A., CHT is a Certified Hypnotherapist, Western Astrologer and Author who counsels clients through her business of Iris Holistic Counseling Services on the road at http://www.DonnaFisherJackson.com. She has published the self-help book, The Healing Path of the Romantic: Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System and a novel, Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives, based on the true story of a Romantic. And now her latest book, a travel adventure book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road.  All of her books are available in a print and Kindle edition on Amazon.

Posted in RV Living, Traveling cross country | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Search for the Perfect Bed for My RV from the book, Living the RV Lifestyle

Winslow, Arizona

My Perfect Bed arrived while I was standing on the corner in Winslow, Arizona.  Just one of the personal tales in my new book, Living the RV Lifestyle.  The story of the search for the perfect bed for my RV is below.

Donna’s latest book can be found on Amazon.com  and as a Kindle E-reader, Click here to go to the Kindle store.

BookCoverImage

Editorial Reviews of Living the RV Lifestyle

“As the title indicates, this is a book with a lot of practical advice and personal experiences gleaned from living full-time in an RV…Her book details how to buy, prepare and afford the RV lifestyle of your dreams. This book would be especially helpful for newbies, but would also serve as reminders for experienced RVers.”

Marcella Gauthier, columnist of, From the Bookshelf in the Escapees Magazine (www.escapees.com)

 “Whether someone is considering a full-timing road trip as a permanent way life or a temporary adventure, Living the RV Lifestyle: Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is filled with the author’s many valuable tips for making the most of it.  Trying to balance domestic chores with the RVing learning curve is a challenge for most people. Toss in the need to earn a living while constantly changing locations and the business of learning how to be a nomad turns into a full-time occupation. For anyone who needs to manage all of these lifestyle factors, Donna’s new book lives up to its promise of providing practical advice for success.”

Rene Agredano, columnist for RV Life Magazine (www.rvlife.com)

My new book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is a combination of practical advice on RV living as well as personal stories from life on the road, giving you an idea of what it’s really like to live the Full-time RV life.

The excerpt below is from Chapter 3: Preparing for the Full-time RV Journey

Moving into your New RV Home and What to Pack for Life on the Road

Surprisingly, one of the heaviest items in the RV was the original queen size mattress that came with the Bighorn RV.  In keeping with lightening our load, my husband decided to order a Sleep Number mattress made especially for RVs which is an adjustable air mattress.  I did miss my comfortable bed from my traditional house, which now rested inside the storage shed. The message from my bed story following this section would be:  Make sure you find a comfortable, light-weight bed, hopefully, before you leave the driveway.  If you can live with a queen size, great, but if a king-size will only do, then it will cost you some space in the bedroom.  There are some concessions to be made down-sizing into a smaller space. You do have to leave some of that extra stuff behind for safety on the road, and also, because you just don’t have room for it all.  One of the realities of living in an RV: You are now living in a Tiny Home, and sometimes, that means adjusting to a new bed.

 A Sleepless Adventure – When did I become the Princess Sleeping on the Pea?!

The search for a comfortable bed had become almost laughable.  Like the princess who could feel a pea under her stack of mattresses, I had Jim order a variety of pillow top covers for the bed with none feeling as plushy as my former bed.  Finally, we tossed the mattress that came with the RV into a landfill in Arizona.  While other people remember Winslow, Arizona as the town made famous by the Eagles song, Take it Easy (written by Jackson Browne and Glenn Frey), I will remember Winslow as the final resting place of my RV mattress. 

My new Sleep Number mattress made specifically for RV homes arrived at the Meteor Crater campground in Arizona where we stayed that week.  My sister, Doreen happened to be visiting that memorable week, touring around the national parks with us.  In between visiting the Grand Canyon, Petrified Forest, and Sedona, my bed arrived.  Anticipating a good night’s sleep after a rocky three months on the road, I collapsed onto the bed, experimenting with the range of sleep numbers.  Beginning at a higher number closer to 100, I quickly lowered the firmness of the mattress until I was only left with number 5.  The bed didn’t go any lower, and it still felt too firm for me.  I had become the princess sleeping on a pea. 

After spending all that money on a new queen-size bed, I couldn’t justify buying another one so I piled back on all the pillow top covers until I sunk into a cushy crevice.  Now, I sleep on one side of the bed with a hump in the middle while Jim sleeps on his side at his favorite sleep number.  We both miss our soft-sided king size waterbed.  Perhaps, there is no bed that matches the comfort of our former bed.  I can only think of one bed more comfortable, and that was a feather bed at the Winslow Hotel in Melbourne, Australia where the English royalty stayed when they were in town.  I guess I need a bed fit for a King and a Queen. 

As you can see, I am not really roughing it on this grand circle of the country.  As I tell people on the road, I am not on a camping trip or even a summer vacation, this is my lifestyle now.  If this is going to be my only home, I want to be comfortable.  In the past, I gazed at those long, luxurious RVs, and scoffed that that wasn’t really camping.  Now, I understand why they were living in those wheel estates.  They, too, had probably progressed from the tiny tent to the pop-up camper, and then to the van camper, and finally upgraded into their 40 foot plush palace.  Once you’ve lived in one of these comfortable caravans, it’s hard to go back to sleeping on the ground in a tent with morning dew dripping on your face.  That may be fine in your 20’s, but in your 50’s and older, comfort is what a King and a Queen need on the road.

Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A., CHT is a Certified Hypnotherapist, Western Astrologer and Author who counsels clients through her business of Iris Holistic Counseling Services on the road at http://www.DonnaFisherJackson.com. She has published the self-help book, The Healing Path of the Romantic: Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System and a novel, Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives, based on the true story of a Romantic. And now her latest book, a travel adventure book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road.  All of her books are available in a print and Kindle edition on Amazon.

 

Posted in RV Living, Traveling cross country | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Traveling with your Pets from the book, Living the RV Lifestyle

BookCoverImage

Donna’s latest book can be found on Amazon.com  and as a Kindle E-reader, Click here to go to the Kindle store.

“This book is a fabulous resource for anyone considering travelling this beautiful country for recreation, or as a mobile temporary or permanent lifestyle. The author embarked upon the latter with her husband and cat in tow, leaving their traditional life in Northern California behind, and as a result have seen and experienced 36 national parks during their first 3 years. Not only does this book contain invaluable information regarding the lingo, procedures and logistical aspects of a life on the road, but provides the many options available for those who have various interests and motives for considering doing so. Each informative chapter closes with a tale experienced during their travels, which are insightful and provide a personal perspective. This book contains so much information on this subject and is a pleasant and enjoyable read!”    Posted by an Amazon customer

My new book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road is a combination of practical advice on RV living as well as personal stories from life on the road, giving you an idea of what it’s really like to live the Full-time RV life.

The excerpt below is from Chapter 7Traveling with your Pets

Many people choose the RV lifestyle because they always wanted to travel with their pets.  Some can’t imagine going anywhere even on a cross-country trip without their pets.  As I’ve traveled around the country, I’ve seen so many different breeds of dogs come bounding out of RVs – from Great Danes to tiny Terriers.  Sometimes, I’ve seen people walking three or four dogs around the campground, and head back to their RV where they all piled onboard.

The RV lifestyle can work for many dogs, and even other pets, but it’s probably wise to take some test runs with your pet to see how much they enjoy traveling.  Some dogs ride all the time with their owners in their car, but it’s still a good idea to take them on a week-end trip first in the RV to see how they do, and what they might need.

Some of the essentials are a collar with name tags (even if the pet does have a microchip), a harness, and a couple of different leashes – a shorter, four-to-six foot one for busy areas, and a longer, 10 – 20 foot retractable leash for open areas in the country, and at some campgrounds.  All campgrounds seem to require that pets be on a leash at all times, and most don’t tolerate animals being tied up outside the RVs except when you’re sitting outside with them.

My husband worked as a Camp Host one summer season in Utah, and one of his biggest pet peeves (pardon the pun) was having to remind pet owners about keeping their pets on a leash at all times, and picking up their pet’s poop.  You would think that most people are used to those rules even where they live in more traditional neighborhoods, but it seems some people seem to “forget” the rules when there is no one around watching them.

Anyway, I’ve had the most fun taking my cat, Zeus out for a walk on a leash around the campgrounds.  It seems that a lot of people have not ever seen a cat walking on a leash.  Zeus is now 17 years old, and has been walking on a leash for about 7 years.  His outdoor adventures began at my last home where he was mainly an indoor cat with an occasional outing on the back deck until I decided to try walking him and his brother on a leash.  They were about 10 years old at the time so it did take some practice, but they quickly learned that this was the way to go outside.  At the end of this chapter, I have included a story of Zeus’ travels on the road.

Some campgrounds might insist on keeping your pets’ vaccines up to date.  Some do have you sign forms that attest to this fact, but it’s best to bring along their health records, and extra supplies of their medications just in case of an emergency.

Other items that can make pet travel more comfortable are outdoor bedding, and indoor pet beds; outdoor exercise pens for smaller dogs; favorite toys; a collapsible crate or pet carrier; portable water dishes for hiking and long walks; pick-up bags; first aid kit; dog shampoo and brushes; flea and tick spray; muzzle; orange vest with reflectors for night walks, and hunting season; paw boots for rough terrain, hot sand and cold weather; and a life jacket for swimming and boating.  If they have special food needs, you may want to stock up, but watch the weight in the RV.  Those pet food cans, and large bags of dry food can add up fast.

Having your pet along can make you feel more at home especially as you transition to the Full-time life.  My cat, Zeus has been a great companion and a comfort while we’ve traveled, and one lucky cat, to be able to see so many places in his lifetime.  I think Zeus might have more than nine lives.  Here’s his story.

Pet Adventures – Traveling with My Cat, Zeus, the Road Warrior

Zeus on his perch at Holiday Hills

Like John Steinbeck with his dog, Charley, Jim and I were fortunate to have a traveling cat – not just a cat who tolerated traveling, but who seemed to even love it, more than me at times.  In California, I never took my cats with me on vacations, or even on road trips.  I always called up a friend, and later a pet sitter to keep an eye on my cats while I was away.  I didn’t think of bringing them with me because I usually stayed in hotels or resorts that didn’t allow pets.  I didn’t realize that that was why many people traveled in RVs so that they could bring along their pets on summer vacations and week-end getaways. 

When we finally sold our home in California in June 2014, we decided to drive back to Massachusetts, and take Zeus on his first major road trip.  We had taken him away for a long week-end once, and he did well.  But traveling cross-country was the big test.  Zeus did better than I could have ever imagined.  Most of the time, he quietly sat on my lap, or on the back seat, only getting antsy when he needed to eat or take a bathroom break.  I even got out his leash, and walked him at rest areas if he wanted to go outside.  At most campsites, Zeus couldn’t wait to get out and sniff around just like all the dogs we saw at the campgrounds. 

Eventually, we did see other cats.  But most of the time, they stayed in their RVs, and slept in the big  front windows of the Class A Mobile homes, or peeked out of windows in the Airstreams.  Zeus also claimed his favorite spots in our RV – sitting atop his scratching post next to the dining room table, or on the back of the recliners, and even in the cubbyholes of the RV.  He liked to try new spots so that he could have different views of the outdoors. 

At first, Zeus didn’t mind moving around every week, or two.  But by the end of our first grand circle of the country, he started to grow tired of the constant moving.  I could usually tell when he was sleeping on the bed, and opened one eye in the morning, and gave me a look on moving day.  “Like you gotta be kidding!  We’re moving again.  Didn’t we just get here?”  Okay, maybe, that was me speaking through Zeus.

I think Zeus was as happy as me to arrive on Cape Cod, and stay in my sister’s driveway for a couple of months.  Now, we’ve been staying in more places longer which gives him a chance to really get to know the campground even if the neighbors and their pets keep changing.  At each campground where he’s stayed longer, Zeus has created his walking routine which varies slightly, but most of the time, he checks out the same spots, usually ending up on the picnic table, waiting for a brushing.  I guess cats are also creatures of habit.  Right now, as I write about Zeus, he’s waiting for his nightly walk.  Morning and night, and sometimes mid-day, he ventures out, ready to see the new arrivals at the campground, and to check out the local birds. 

Zeus’ presence on this journey around the country has been a calming influence at times, and comforting when I’ve been moving around so much.  His constant loving attention has been reassuring especially when I left behind many of those creature comforts that make up a home.  Living more simply was one thing, but living without Zeus was never an option.  He’s made the trip more entertaining even with his challenging moments.  Zeus began this trip at age 14, and is still going strong at 17.  I’m hopeful that Zeus will be with us into his 20’s.  Traveling wouldn’t be the same without him.

By Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A. © 2017

Donna Fisher-Jackson, M.A., CHT is a Certified Hypnotherapist, Western Astrologer and Author who counsels clients through her business of Iris Holistic Counseling Services on the road at http://www.DonnaFisherJackson.com. She has published the self-help book, The Healing Path of the Romantic: Type Four of the Enneagram Personality Type System and a novel, Clara & Irving: A Love Story of Past Lives, based on the true story of a Romantic. And now her latest book, a travel adventure book, Living the RV Lifestyle:  Practical Advice and Personal Tales from Life on the Road.  All of her books are available in a print and Kindle edition on Amazon.

Posted in RV Living, Traveling cross country | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment